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Dec 2, 2012 3:00am PST
is the federal government spending under control. we continue to get closer to this incredible fiscal cliff and i think that the president should take a case study analysis and look at what president coolidge did and jfk, john f. kennedy when they went in and lowered tax rates and increased revenues, which is exactly what we're talking about. >> so either you've got a president who is tremendously overconfident after being reelected or someone who asks for the sty in the first offer knowing that he will look like the compromising once he gives in on the demands and gets himself involved in negotiations. >> both sides are waiting to see who is going to offer up the plan first, we're waiting on the white house. >> it's the president's job, isn't it? congress controls the purse strings and the white house is waiting for-- we're waiting for something from congress on their side and go back and forth, who puts up the offer first and it's the first salvo, so, michigan mcconnell laughs at it and timothy geithner hands it to them. this isn't real. >> i didn't know that first was the first offer. we have
Dec 5, 2012 11:00am PST
of the fiscal cliff negotiations. the mortgage interest deduction. government spending on this will reach $100 million by 2014, making it the third largest tax break on the books. who does it help? 41 million people. the most recent irs data showed that 41 million people claimed this deduction on their 2010 tax returns. the tax policy center says it tends to benefit upper middle class families the most. these bars show income in the circles the average savings. for those with incomes of less than $40,000 a year, their savings is $91, look at the people who make $250,000 and more. their average savings is about $5500. this benefits people most on both coasts and cities like chicago, with higher property prices, and we watch the fiscal cliff negotiations closely for what could happen next to this tax goody next year. >> here's the question i'm hearing people ask, if we go off the cliff here, how big a hit will we take on taxs? stand by, because i'm about to give you the closest answer i possibly can. to help me with that is laurie montgomery, she is the fiscal policy reporter for the washington
Dec 4, 2012 4:00am PST
are headed here to washington today to tell president obama their thoughts on the fiscal cliff. the bipartisan group says both sides need to work together to avoid the tax increases and spending cuts due to kick in at the end of the year. >> no one's going to get what they want, but as a country to move forward, we've got to figure out who gives where, and if everything is going to be out on the table, how do we negotiate that? >> reporter: republicans have given a counterproposal to the president's plan which he issued last week. they say their plan would cut $2.2 trillion from the federal deficit over ten years. with $600 billion in health care cuts, $300 billion in cuts to mandatory spending and another $300 billion in cuts to other federal spending. the biggest difference between the republican plan and the president's remains taxes and how the government can generate more revenue to pay down the debt. >> rates have to rise on the top 2%. there's no other way to do it. >> reporter: president obama says his plan will raise taxes on the rich, bringing in $1.6 trillion. republ
Nov 29, 2012 2:00am PST
is spending. no one wants to talk about spending. the fiscal cliff is a bipartisan compromise that would do draconian cuts in the budget they never wanted in the first place. it's foolish to think congress will have a plan to fix things when congress designed the plan they are trying to fix. >> some democrats say entitlements can be on the table but should deal with long-term reform afterwards. here's what senator dick durbin said yesterday on "starting point." >> entitlements need to be part of the long-term strategy but do it in a thoughtful way. i don't want to see major changes decided in the heat of the moment. let's get through the fiscal cliff, find a way to avert it. but at the end of the day treat it as the important program it is for so many millions of americans. >> eric, if we get a deal, how much kicking of the can down the road do you think that deal will inclu include? >> i think it will include significant kicking the can down the road which is why they should kick the entire deal down the road and deal with it together. we know it won't from happen history. we have had 18 o
Dec 5, 2012 6:00am EST
when we look at the fiscal cliff and everything else in terms of actual cuts in spending, everybody recoils in horror because they know it implies. >> you made your point, though, we surrendered to fdr, and instead of supplementing people, instead of letting them earn their own success, we're going to somehow try to deal with outcome rather than opportunity and pay for it. and you want to pay for -- >> no, i don't. >> in a fairer society. what you see as a fairer society. >> i didn't say it was a fairer society. but chris brought up an important point. and i want people to talk about the "wall street journal" today. we're not talking about cutting spending, not talking about cutting growth rates, which is a huge difference, one reason why people like me look at former presidential candidate mitt romney talk about npr or planned parenthood. the number one answer for balancing the budget is foreign aid. which if you really wanted to balance the budget and you don't always have to go to the department of justice or whatever it may be. but over the next ten years, 90% of federal outlays
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5